Dealing with the emotional impacts of Cancer -Daffodil Day Friday 22 August 2014

Daffodil Day CC  logoAlmost everyone will know someone who has been diagnosed with cancer, whether it be a loved one, a friend, a neighbour or a colleague. According to statistics held by the Australian Government, in 2014, 128290 Australians were diagnosed with some form of cancer.

Depending on their individual diagnosis and prognosis, everyone copes differently with the disease and the challenges that it presents. Many cancer sufferers and their families find it helpful to hear from others who have been through it, and becoming a member of support groups like that offered by Cancer Council can be very beneficial.

The rollercoaster of emotions cancer patients and their families face after diagnosis can be difficult to deal with. Counselling can help people deal with these emotions. Anger, fear, confusion, uncertainty and also guilt are normal emotions to feel as a person adjusts to this kind of life event. Some people may go through a stage of denial about the diagnosis, especially if they actually feel perfectly healthy.

Cancer and its medical treatment may leave you feeling unwell. As a result, sadness and hopelessness can develop, and can lead to the onset of depression. Cancer can change the way you think about your body and yourself as a person, but there are positive ways of dealing with the emotional grief that the situation presents.

Confiding in a friend or family member can be a good way to outwardly express your emotions, however often such conversations can lead to frustration and anger with feelings that they just don’t understand. Sometimes talking to a health professional, who is not emotionally involved, such as doctor or psychologist, can be a good way to develop positive coping strategies.

This Friday 22nd August, thousands of volunteers across the country will be working towards defeating cancer by selling Daffodil Day merchandise, show you care by buying a pin or flower and help support this very worthy cause.

More information and a list of useful resources is available at: www.cancercouncil.org.au or www.daffodilday.com.au

For more information on our team of experienced Psychologists visit: www.psychologyconsultants.com.au

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